The Digi-Cult

A New Religion for a Digital Age

Posts Tagged ‘Art’

How to Make Mistakes on Purpose was Successful

Posted by Matt Harbottle on December 3, 2008

When considering all aspects of graphic design, there are a lot of do’s and don’ts that go along with it.  There are tons of rules and guidelines that an artist should follow to create a successful, structured composition, that will please the viewer.  Apparently that isn’t always the case, according to Laurie Rosenwald.

Laurie is a successful artist, who’s areas of expertise include drawing, graphic design, and typography.  She is also a published author and has taught graphic design at School of Visual Arts, Parsons School of Design, NYU, and Pratt Institute.  She tours the world, teaching a workshop called “How to Make Mistakes on Purpose.”

Rosenwald can be seen as an open-minded, “crazy” artist who is successful at what she does, with a no holds barred attitude, that stirs attention from all around the world.  Her philosophy being, “If you try very hard to create a good thing it will probably be bad.”  So on that note, she tries to promote that an artist should try to make mistakes… on purpose.  Not quite following?  Me either.

I’ve decided to give her crazy antics some consideration and attend her workshop that will be held in Banff, Alberta, on November 20-23.  I’m curious to see how she will lay out the processes of purposely making mistakes.  She emphasizes that anyone can attend and it’s not just for designers.  This is where it begins to worry me.

I hope to not waste a whole weekend of my life to listen to someone tell me how to get into my spiritual mindset and to let go of what I thought I knew about design.  Unfortunately for us skeptics, the outline of the workshop does not exist, for the content “MUST be a SURPRISE.”  Once again, getting worried, but I will still give it a try.

For anyone interested in attending the workshop, visit Laurie’s website for dates.

 

UPDATE

 

banff2

My apologies to Laurie.  Apparently the workshop in November was a complete success.  Unable to attend myself, I heard nothing but good things.  My previous post above, which I had originally posted in October, may have come off as detouring to some readers.  I really wish I could have attended, but due to school and work, this wasn’t possible.

The activities included in the workshop were as wacky and unusual as I had anticipated.  Unable to discuss what had all taken place at the workshop, my fellow artists from school that did attend, simple commented that, “it was weird.”  One could only imagine what really did take place that weekend.  Looking at this picture that was taken from the workshop… who knows?  

 

Matt

 

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Barack Obama Art Movement

Posted by Matt Harbottle on November 19, 2008

As we know, President-Elect Barack Obama will be stepping into office in January 2009.  He is now known as the “wired” president, but did you know he’s an art movement as well?  Most artwork produced that revolves around Barack himself came out during the pre-election period as people wanted to show their support, at the same time promoting him.  But since he has won the election, the “Barack art” keeps on coming.obama-art-22

The Artworks come in all different mediums, but it seems that a lot of the pieces distributed online tend to be from digital art forms.  Coincidence that Barack being “wired” would fuel these digital works?  Probably not, but to me I think it’s an interesting concept.  Why now?  Why didn’t art movements take off before when other American elections were taking place?  Maybe the idea of being “wired” to the youths of the world relates to being “cool” and in touch with what’s really going on.  After all the old, out-of-date presidents prior, why wouldn’t they want to promote and idolize a guy like Barack by creating artworks of him.

obama-21As it stands right now, everything Barack touches turns to gold.  Barack art is selling like there’s no tomorrow.  As many sites online are out to make a buck  by selling these artworks, I would hope that most artists would be doing it just for the sake of showing their appreciation and support.  On the other hand, if the opportunity arose to make some money at it, I’m not sure if I could really blame the artists who make a few dollars at it.  After all, the world has gone “Obama Crazy.”

Hundreds of sites have been popping up that showcase “Barak art,” even sites like the Obama Art report that are specifically dedicated to the art movement.  Another site, Design for Obama, is a free site that shows how graphic designers best support Barack obama. 

shirts

So maybe this gave Barack a slight advantage over John McCain’s campaign.  Having attractive, well designed shirts and clothing that McCain seemed to lack.

Not only did the movement take-off online, exhibitions have sprouted all around the world as well.  One American exhibition can be seen here, and another I found interseting is this gallery all the way in Paris, France.

Matt

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Art and Science Collide

Posted by Matt Harbottle on November 12, 2008

 

dna_strandThere has always been a connection between art and science, artists and scientists, and alike.  It’s not always easy to find an artist-scientist, but they’ve always been around.  They have been evident throughout the centuries and one that comes to mind would be Leonardo di Vinci.  He was considered to be one of the greatest painters of all time, at the same time being a noted scientist.

Today, people are really starting to tap into this idea of combining art and science.  To push cutting-edge art into the limelight, artists, engineers, etc, are using  the combination of the two fields to produce amazing pieces of work.  In one of my earlier blogs, “Welcome to the New Age of Interactive Art,” I briefly discuss how interactive art is pushing the limits of what is “art” this day in age.  Without the use of physics, mathematics, robotics, engineering, along with an artistic idea, those examples I had shown would never had been created.

With artists becoming aware of sciences and scientists becoming aware of the artistic potential of their abilities, they are defining what people consider, post-modern or contemporary art.  Shannon O’Grady posted a blog titled “Coming Soon to an Orchestra Pit Near You,” which shows a robot named WF-4RIV, who was created and programmed at Waseda University in Japan, to play Flight of the Bumblebees on the flute.  This is a great example of great engineering and a great artistic piece of work. 

With so many exhibitions showcasing work that revolves around the idea of art and science combined, I’m curious to see how artists/scientists will keep trying to raise the bar on this re-defined art form.

Matt

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How to Make Mistakes on Purpose

Posted by Matt Harbottle on October 15, 2008

When considering all aspects of graphic design, there are a lot of do’s and don’ts that go along with it.  There are tons of rules and guidelines that an artist should follow to create a successful, structured composition, that will please the viewer.  Apparently that isn’t always the case, according to Laurie Rosenwald.

Laurie is a successful artist, who’s areas of expertise include drawing, graphic design, and typography.  She is also a published author and has taught graphic design at School of Visual Arts, Parsons School of Design, NYU, and Pratt Institute.  She tours the world, teaching a workshop called “How to Make Mistakes on Purpose.”

Rosenwald can be seen as an open-minded, “crazy” artist who is successful at what she does, with a no holds barred attitude, that stirs attention from all around the world.  Her philosophy being, “If you try very hard to create a good thing it will probably be bad.”  So on that note, she tries to promote that an artist should try to make mistakes… on purpose.  Not quite following?  Me either.

I’ve decided to give her crazy antics some consideration and attend her workshop that will be held in Banff, Alberta, on November 20-23.  I’m curious to see how she will lay out the processes of purposely making mistakes.  She emphasizes that anyone can attend and it’s not just for designers.  This is where it begins to worry me.

I hope to not waste a whole weekend of my life to listen to someone tell me how to get into my spiritual mindset and to let go of what I thought I knew about design.  Unfortunately for us skeptics, the outline of the workshop does not exist, for the content “MUST be a SURPRISE.”  Once again, getting worried, but I will still give it a try.

For anyone interested in attending the workshop, visit Laurie’s website for dates.

Matt

Posted in Digital Culture | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Welcome to the New Age of Interactive Art

Posted by Matt Harbottle on October 8, 2008

  

When you think about the word “art,” what comes to mind? For me as a graphic designer, the first things are, paintings, drawings, sculptures, digital prints, and so on, but apparently those mediums just don’t cut it anymore. Welcome to the new world of interactive art.

 

 

I would have never thought that to become a cutting edge artist in the twenty-first century, one would have to spend years in school learning computer sciences, engineering, physics, robotics, and alike. Now it’s evident that to catch someone’s eye, you have to bring something new and exciting to the table. I.e, Interactive art. 

 

 

 

Most North American’s can say that they’ve attended an art gallery or exhibition of some kind at one point or another in their life. If not an art enthusiast, a lot would probably say it was “boring.” On the other hand, traditional art lover’s analyse art from an emotional standpoint and base it on how it makes them feel. What if you could attend an exhibition and not only have the art spark certain emotions, but also communicate and interact with you? It caught my attention. 

 

To consider a piece of art being interactive, it would have to involve the spectator in some way. I have seen so many variations and techniques used now, it seems the possibilities are endless of what the designers can come up with. Some incorporate sounds, music, physical movement and illusions, which turns the art into a multimedia art-form, opposed to just 2D and 3D art. Interesting collision of artistic expression pooled into one form, which questions if static or stationary art is enough anymore?

 

 

So what’s the next art craze? Artists are trying to create the next movement constantly, combining new and old styles, where some artists are successful. To view some good examples of these artists, I would suggest visiting Processing.org to view some great and not so great work.

 

Matt

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